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Morcellator Medical Malpractice

Little Rock Defective Product Attorney

Each year, surgeons use power morcellators to perform approximately 50,000 hysterectomies and myomectomies, which involve removing a woman’s uterus or uterine fibroids. The morcellator—essentially a powered device with sharp edges and cutting jaws—creates a small incision that, in theory, allows patients to heal more quickly than with traditional surgery. However, according to recent studies, power morcellators can leave behind cancerous cells that migrate to tissues in other parts of the body.

If you or someone you love developed uterine leiomyosarcoma (ULMS), abdominal cancer, or uterine cancer after undergoing a laparoscopic uterine fibroid surgery, myomectomy, or hysterectomy using a power morcellator device, you may be entitled to compensation for your medical bills, pain and suffering, and more. Contact our defective product attorneys today for a free initial consultation.

Morcellator Hysterectomy Dangers

While a traditional hysterectomy surgery removes the uterus in one piece with incisions that may be 3 to 7 inches long, the power morcellator’s small blades allow for minimally invasive hysterectomies by removing the uterus in pieces.

When surgeons use morcellators in uterine surgery, previously undetected cancerous uterine fibroid tissue may be liquefied, allowing cancer to spread throughout a patient’s abdominal cavity. This can result in metastization and new, life-threatening tumors.

Research shows that uterine surgeries performed using morcellators may significantly reduce the odds of long-term survival in women with undetected uterine sarcoma, a type of cancer that includes ULMS. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) estimates that 1 in 350 women who undergo hysterectomies and myomectomies have an undetected uterine sarcoma.

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FDA Discourages Morcellator Use

The FDA issued a safety communication discouraging surgeons from using power morcellator devices in hysterectomies and myomectomies. Even when specimen bags are used to prevent cancerous uterine tissue from spreading throughout the body, FDA officials recommend doctors discuss the cancer risks associated with morcellator surgeries with patients prior to operating.

Get the Legal Help You Need

Medical device manufacturers have powerful legal teams dedicated to protecting their profits. We’re not afraid to stand up to big corporations to get you the money you deserve. If you or your loved one were diagnosed with uterine leiomyosarcoma (ULMS) after a laparoscopic hysterectomy, myomectomy, or fibroid removal surgery, we‘re here help you get the compensation you need. Don’t pay for a corporation’s negligence. Contact us today.

This law firm is not associated with, sponsored by, or affiliated with Advancing Minimally Invasive Gynecology Worldwide or the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

 

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